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1. Kaur  J, Verma  M, Lal  R,     ( 2011 )

Rhizobium rosettiformans sp. nov., isolated from a hexachlorocyclohexane dump site, and reclassification of Blastobacter aggregatus Hirsch and Muller 1986 as Rhizobium aggregatum comb. nov.

International journal of systematic and evolutionary microbiology 61 (Pt 5)
PMID : 20584817  :   DOI  :   10.1099/ijs.0.017491-0    
Abstract >>
A Gram-negative, rod-shaped, motile, aerobic bacterial strain, W3(T), was isolated from hexachlorocyclohexane (HCH)-contaminated groundwater from Lucknow, India, and its taxonomic position was determined using a polyphasic approach. Strain W3(T) shared highest 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity of 97.8 % with Rhizobium selenitireducens B1(T), followed by Rhizobium daejeonense L61(T) (97.7 %), Rhizobium radiobacter ATCC 19358(T) (97.5 %) and Blastobacter aggregatus IFAM 1003(T) (97.2 %). Strain W3(T) formed a monophyletic clade with Blastobacter aggregatus IFAM 1003(T) (= DSM 1111(T)) in the cluster of species of the genus Rhizobium. Phylogenetic analyses of strain W3(T) using atpD and recA gene sequences confirmed the phylogenetic arrangements obtained by using 16S rRNA gene sequences. Hence, the taxonomic characterization of B. aggregatus DSM 1111(T) was also undertaken. Strains W3(T) and B. aggregatus DSM 1111(T) contained summed feature 8 (18 : 1�s7c and/or 18 : 1�s6c; 65.4 and 70.8 %, respectively) as the major fatty acid, characteristic of the genus Rhizobium. DNA-DNA relatedness of strain W3(T) with Rhizobium selenitireducens LMG 24075(T), Rhizobium daejeonense DSM 17795(T), Rhizobium radiobacter DSM 30147(T) and B. aggregatus DSM 1111(T) was 42, 34, 30 and 34 %, respectively. The DNA G+C contents of strain W3(T) and B. aggregatus DSM 1111(T) were 62.3 and 62.7 mol%, respectively. A nifH gene encoding dinitrogenase reductase was detected in strain W3(T) but not in B. aggregatus DSM 1111(T). Based on the results obtained by phylogenetic and chemotaxonomic analyses, phenotypic characterization and DNA-DNA hybridization, it is concluded that strain W3(T) represents a novel species of the genus Rhizobium, for which the name Rhizobium rosettiformans sp. nov. is proposed (type strain W3(T) = CCM 7583(T) = MTCC 9454(T)). It is also proposed that Blastobacter aggregatus Hirsch and M?ller 1986 be transferred to the genus Rhizobium as Rhizobium aggregatum comb. nov. (type strain IFAM 1003(T) = DSM 1111(T) = ATCC 43293(T)).
KeywordMeSH Terms
2. Li  H, Zeng  XC, He  Z, Chen  X, E  G, Han  Y, Wang  Y,     ( 2016 )

Long-term performance of rapid oxidation of arsenite in simulated groundwater using a population of arsenite-oxidizing microorganisms in a bioreactor.

Water research 101 (N/A)
PMID : 27288673  :   DOI  :   10.1016/j.watres.2016.05.058    
Abstract >>
A population of arsenite-oxidizing microorganisms enriched from the tailing of the Shimen realgar mine was used to generate biofilms on the surfaces of perlites. This bioreactor is able to completely oxidize 1100 �gg/L As(III) dissolved in simulated groundwater into As(V) within 10 min; after 140 days of operation, approximately 20 min were required to completely oxidize the same concentration of As(III). Analysis for the 16S rRNA genes of the microbial community showed that Bacteroidetes and Proteobacteria are dominant in the reactor. Six different bacterial strains were randomly isolated from the reactor. Function and gene analysis indicated that all the isolates possess arsenite-oxidizing activity, and five of them are chemoautotrophic. Further analysis showed that a large diversity of AioAs and two types of RuBisCOs are present in the microbial community. This suggests that many chemoautotrophic arsenite-oxidizing microorganisms were responsible for quick oxidation of arsenite in the reactor. We also found that the reactor is easily regenerated and its number is readily expanded. To the best of our knowledge, the arsenite-oxidizing efficiency, which was expressed as the minimum time for complete oxidization of a certain concentration of As(III) under a single operation, of this bioreactor is the highest among the described bioreactors; it is also the most stable, economic and environment-friendly.
KeywordMeSH Terms
Arsenic-resistant bacteria
Arsenite oxidation
Biofilm reactor
Bioremediation
High-arsenic groundwater
Realgar mine
Arsenic-resistant bacteria
Arsenite oxidation
Biofilm reactor
Bioremediation
High-arsenic groundwater
Realgar mine
Arsenic-resistant bacteria
Arsenite oxidation
Biofilm reactor
Bioremediation
High-arsenic groundwater
Realgar mine
Arsenic-resistant bacteria
Arsenite oxidation
Biofilm reactor
Bioremediation
High-arsenic groundwater
Realgar mine
Arsenic-resistant bacteria
Arsenite oxidation
Biofilm reactor
Bioremediation
High-arsenic groundwater
Realgar mine
Arsenic-resistant bacteria
Arsenite oxidation
Biofilm reactor
Bioremediation
High-arsenic groundwater
Realgar mine
Arsenites
3. Mousavi  SA, Willems  A, Nesme  X, de Lajudie  P, Lindström  K,     ( 2015 )

Revised phylogeny of Rhizobiaceae: proposal of the delineation of Pararhizobium gen. nov., and 13 new species combinations.

Systematic and applied microbiology 38 (2)
PMID : 25595870  :   DOI  :   10.1016/j.syapm.2014.12.003    
Abstract >>
The family Rhizobiaceae accommodates the seven genera Rhizobium, Neorhizobium, Allorhizobium, Agrobacterium, Ensifer (syn. Sinorhizobium), Shinella and Ciceribacter. However, several so-called Rhizobium species do not exhibit robust phylogenetic positions. Rhizobium is extremely heterogeneous and is in need of major revision. Therefore, a phylogenetic examination of the family Rhizobiaceae by multilocus sequence analysis (MLSA) of four housekeeping genes among 100 strains of the family was undertaken. Based on the results we propose the delineation of the new genus Pararhizobium in the Rhizobiaceae family, and 13 new species combinations: Agrobacterium nepotum comb. nov., Agrobacterium pusense comb. nov., Agrobacterium skierniewicense comb. nov., Allorhizobium vitis comb. nov., Allorhizobium taibaishanense comb. nov., Allorhizobium paknamense comb. nov., Allorhizobium oryzae comb. nov., Allorhizobium pseudoryzae comb. nov., Allorhizobium borbori comb. nov., Pararhizobium giardinii comb. nov., Pararhizobium capsulatum comb. nov., Pararhizobium herbae comb. nov., and Pararhizobium sphaerophysae comb. nov.
KeywordMeSH Terms
Housekeeping genes
MLSA
Rhizobiaceae
Phylogeny
4.     ( 2012 )

Robust markers reflecting phylogeny and taxonomy of rhizobia.

PloS one 7 (9)
PMID : 23028691  :   DOI  :   10.1371/journal.pone.0044936     PMC  :   PMC3444505    
Abstract >>
Genomic ANI (Average Nucleotide Identity) has been found to be able to replace DNA-DNA hybridization in prokaryote taxonomy. The ANI of each of the core genes that has a phylogeny congruent with the reference species tree of rhizobia was compared to the genomic ANI. This allowed us to identify three housekeeping genes (SMc00019-truA-thrA) whose ANI reflected the intraspecies and interspecies genomic ANI among rhizobial strains, revealing an ANI gap (?2%) between the inter- and intra-species comparisons. The intraspecies (96%) and interspecies (94%) ANI boundaries calculated from three genes (SMc00019-truA-thrA) provided a criterion for bacterial species definition and confirmed 621/629 of known interspecies relationships within Bradyrhizobium, Mesorhizobium, Sinorhizobium and Rhizobium. Some widely studied strains should be renamed. The SMc00019-truA-thrA ANI also correlates well with the genomic ANI of strains in Agrobacterium, Methylobacterium, Ralstonia, Rhodopseudomonas, Cupriavidus and Burkholderia, suggesting their wide applicability in other bacteria.
KeywordMeSH Terms
Phylogeny

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